How Anne Germanacos Became a Writer

May 14, 2012 — 151 Comments

As writers, we live double lives: lived once in the world of others, and again, in the quiet of our own minds. It takes a certain amount of will and courage to leave with regularity the circle of humanity in order to enact a kind of theft, which is one aspect of what the writing life seems to be.

Anne Germanacos is the author of the short story collection In the Time of Girls (BOA Editions). Born in San Francisco, she has lived in Greece for over thirty years. Together with her husband, Nick Germanacos, she ran the Ithaka Cultural Studies Program on the islands of Kalymnos and Crete, and taught writing, literature, and Modern Greek. She holds an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars. Her work has appeared in over eighty literary reviews and anthologies, including Dzanc’s Best of the Web 2009. She and her husband have four children and five grandchildren. They live on Crete and in San Francisco.

Web page: http://www.annegermanacos.com/

Update June 13-14, 2012: Celebrating Freshly Pressed with a book giveaway! Click here for a chance to win a signed copy of Anne’s book.

Read more by and about Anne:

Book: In the Time of the Girls
Short Story: “Killing the Husband”
Interview: A Writer’s Dictionary
Short Story: “Whore of Babel”
Book Review at Blackbird
Flashes: “Drops (rain, lemon, tear) Cough!

How Anne Germanacos Became a Writer

This is the next installment in the How to Become a Writer interview series, which will post here at Ph.D. in Creative Writing every other Sunday until I run out of writers to interview, or until they stop saying yes. Each writer answers the same 5 questions. Thanks to Donna Miscolta for recommending Anne, and thanks to Anne for saying yes!

1.  Why did you want to become a writer?

Writing brought the world into a different focus while conferring something that felt like a secret, additional self.

The desire began with this revelation of clarity, difference, separateness and power. (I’m sure my receptivity to the revelation was encouraged by need.)

Writing offered another body (in words) that could hold the many shifting parts, adding new ones when they occurred. It allowed me to go my own way, holding out the possibility even in situations that required me to go against my own grain.

2.  How did you go about becoming a writer?

I became a writer by writing every day, creating, rewriting, sometimes destroying in order to make space for something new.

As writers, we live double lives: lived once in the world of others, and again, in the quiet of our own minds. It takes a certain amount of will and courage to leave with regularity the circle of humanity in order to enact a kind of theft, which is one aspect of what the writing life seems to be.

If we steal in the right way—from ourselves and the world—we may fashion (and be rewarded with) a gift. I love the ecology of writing, the way it turns nothing into something, generally without too much damage to the environment.

Painting by Belinda Bryce

My writing is in constant (often unconscious) conversation with the books I read. Writing for many years without an audience, reading gave me a sense of the human community we’re all a part of, and written companions. It made me want to write something worthy of that conversation.

More than anything, though, it’s likely I became a writer by a certain act of daring: I left home at seventeen to live in another country, married and had children young, taught, and wrote. I’m sure it was the desire to be a writer—to make a life that would nourish and replenish me as a writer—that allowed me to make such a bold decision. Being in love didn’t hurt, either.

3.  Who helped you along the way, and how?

When I was 12, a teacher encouraged me to write daily, and because I was a little in love with him, I did. The next teacher who responded to my writing returned my love, and so we’ve been married for many years. Having someone by my side who never faltered in supporting my desire to write helped tremendously to create, if not smooth, the path. (There is no smooth path to becoming a writer.)

Painting by Belinda Bryce

My children required me to be strong enough to be both a mother and a writer. In order to teach, I had to read carefully and find ways of conveying a passion for language to young people who were sometimes more interested in other endeavors. Sometimes, though, the intensity of their focus made class worthy of a story!

Graduate school gave me fine teachers, a sympathetic audience and wonderful, supportive writing friends. This community was both preparation for and launch toward the book that would garner a small audience.

4.  Can you tell me about a writer or artist whose biography inspires you?

Rather than looking to a particular writer or artist’s biography, I take inspiration from any life along the way and hold my life against any number of lives, measuring, to know how far I have to go, as a person first, always, because without the primacy of the life—both lived and imagined—there’s no story.

I recently read a biography of the artist Joan Mitchell and was fascinated by the descriptions of the way she saw—she had an eidetic memory and synesthesia, to boot! It sometimes helps me to understand the way I move through space and time, trying to make something of it, by stepping away from words toward another medium, and one I don’t work in.

I recently read a biography of the artist Joan Mitchell and was fascinated by the descriptions of the way she saw—she had an eidetic memory and synesthesia, to boot!

I admire the work of Homer, Padgett Powell, WG Sebald, Geoff Dyer, Isaac Babel. Grace Paley, Adam Phillips, Anne Carson. David Markson, David Malouf. Virginia Woolf, Emily Dickinson. I could go on.

The work they produced against their days helps sustain me—as a human being and a writer. Also, some of these writers have created works that seem to lend validity to certain less conventional aspects of my own writing.

I know that doesn’t exactly answer the question. I guess I’m resistant!

5.  What would you say in a short letter to an aspiring writer?

Minimize doubt. Find a way—a method, a trick, a psychological tic to dissolve doubt’s potency. You will most likely always be working alongside it, so best to have some useful way of repelling it. I write against it, a little like diving into a cold pool of water—scary but invigorating. Generally, it does the trick. But if that doesn’t work, get up and do something else. Forget about it for a while.

Be gentle with yourself—you will find so many reasons not to be. But it’s most likely your kindness toward yourself (I’m not saying self-indulgence) that will help you alongside the rigors of constant, daily writing.

I can’t speak to a practice that is anything less than daily. It’s the only one I know, so it’s the one I peddle.

By writing daily, you make it your life.

And one more thing: publication is the icing on the cake. The act of writing itself gives you a way to be in the world and is its own reward. Publication just makes it okay, finally, to actually mention that you’re a writer.

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151 responses to How Anne Germanacos Became a Writer

  1. 

    this was so good and thoughtful. i like thinking of it as a “kind of theft.” perhaps not something people outside your immediate family will ever understand, but it’s part of the decision.

  2. 

    I found this encouraging to read and very helpful to get me
    back on track.

  3. 

    Very encouraging. The thing about living alongside doubt is so true. One cannot expect every written word churned out to be genius. It’s a tough way but the only way.

  4. 

    Reblogged this on A different person and commented:
    Every writer’s secret I guess…

  5. 

    great story, inspiring stuff.
    I’ve just had a children’s book published and am trying to push it to a wider audience. Another on the way. Stories like this spur me on.
    Simon x

  6. 

    It’s always comforting hear writers I admire admit just how hard writing is. Minimize doubt-I’m trying! Thanks.

  7. 

    Reblogged this on Carmentain's Blog and commented:
    Here some inspiration to create against all the odds

  8. 

    It’s not easy!
    Steven Wade, Edinburgh and Dundee

  9. 

    I so admire your wisdom and courage and especially wish that I were as disciplined as you in writing daily! But you have a beautiful philosophy and I look forward to reading more of your writing.

  10. 
    FindYourParadigm.com June 7, 2012 at 4:38 pm

    Thank you for this – I am a new writer and appreciate your inspiration!

  11. 

    Wonderful post, and congrats on being freshly pressed.

  12. 

    Loved the interview. Thanks

  13. 

    Thank you for the insite. I really enjoyed reading the part about what you would say to aspiring writers–it seems like great advice!

    Cheers,
    Courtney Hosny
    http://www.oneweektocrazy.com

  14. 

    Very Inspiring. It should be passion and desire to write that makes our work outstanding.
    If you don’t mind I would love you to follow me on my blog: http://www. goldenfingers.wordpress.com . My latest article titled: SKin Controversy

  15. 

    Sometimes I get lost in the thoughts in my mind and it isn’t until I can grasp onto one of those in order to expand on something worth telling – that is when I know I have to write it down and get it out of me. I wish I could get lost more often, but the daily reality of life gets in the way.

  16. 

    Loved the interview and insights. Appreciated the list of favourite writers too.

  17. 

    Congratulations on the ‘freshly pressed’ – this is a fabulous blog for wordy folks – I’ve just read The Aunt’s Story by Patrick White, the reading equivalent of wading through treacle…..synesthesia overload! I much prefer Malouf, and Ann Carson’s object poem. Fantastic post for getting people thinking a bit deeper than the usual blog offerings.

  18. 

    Minimize doubt. That is so crucial. Thanks from a greek girl in Spain.

  19. 

    Reblogged this on Begin an Adventure Blog and commented:
    Best interview/blog/question/answer session I have read about another writer in a long time. I love how she talks about ‘double lives’ and dissolving doubt’s potency like ‘diving into a cold pool of water’. It is brilliant and beautiful. xoxo

  20. 

    Minimize doubt. That is so crucial.

  21. 

    Favorite part “My writing is in constant (often unconscious) conversation with the books I read. Writing for many years without an audience, reading gave me a sense of the human community we’re all a part of, and written companions. It made me want to write something worthy of that conversation.” I can so relate to this and I think outside of the doubt this is what hinders me most when I write. The feeling that the words and the story are just empty and not worthy of much more than as they appear on the page. This was a good enlightening post.

  22. 

    Reblogged this on Drops Of Ink and commented:
    I talked a bit about doubt in one of my post and also about finding yourself and voice as a writer. This however really gives it a face and application.

  23. 

    Thanks for sharing your story as a writer. At least your readers are informed what is like to become a writer. Cheers to your beautiful write-ups. Have a nice day and God bless! 🙂

    —————
    colorado springs divorce lawyers

  24. 

    While I’m not saying this isn’t good motivation, I’d like to remind everyone that this does not include self-publishing.

  25. 

    I was writing in my journal about the very thoughts you wrote about here. The doubt, the purgatory I feel lost in when I want to be able to say, finally, I’m a writer. Beautiful piece.

  26. 

    Brilliant. Her first three responses are almost twin to what my own would be for becoming a writer.

  27. 

    Many thanks for your suggestions!

  28. 

    Thanks for the interview. Your advice on dispelling self-doubt is spot on. It’s something that certainly affects me. I’m at a very early stage in my attempt to become a writer. I welcome constructive criticism, but it’s hard not to mentally accumulate the criticism and forget how it should be constructive. Comments are always welcome on my own creative writing blog at http://vanitypublisher.wordpress.com/ – Thanks again.

  29. 

    This is luscious. Thank you!

  30. 

    ya sou, anne! te kanis? hmm…surely synchronicity lives! i say that as i too am a lover of reading and writing…i too love crete (although last time i was there was way back in 88!). but i have a great fear about writing…how will i make enough to live on!! i need to pay bills like everyone else….perhaps i need to read further into your blog and see how u did it! great work…pls let us have more! ya sus, kali tihi!

  31. 

    Thank you. Insightful for visual artists too. I replaced “writing” with “painting” when reading. Due to upcoming move, I’ve been packing more than painting. Need to steal back some painting time. Much appreciated. Such a well-presented blog too!

  32. 

    It’s encouraging to know that doubt is present for everyone, everywhere, no matter talent or education, and among authors of all kinds. Thank you for this!

  33. 

    Beautifully inspiring. Thank you so much for this! The most comforting part of this post is the acknowledgement of doubt riding beside those write. Having quieted that doubt myself only recently (and likely for only a very short while), I am finally beginning the practice of writing everyday. For those of us who dream of creating something worthy of being published and left behind in the world, pearls of wisdom from you and others who have accomplished such a task are incredibly precious and appreciated.

  34. 

    Thanks so much for your comments, everyone! I’m a huge fan of Anne Germanacos, and I’m delighted that her interview is getting this attention. I post a new interview every two weeks, so visit again!

    Kelcey, aka Phd in Creative Writing

  35. 

    I am recently pursuing a writing career. It is very hard to get into the market, but I’m not giving up.

  36. 

    I wonder how leaving San Francisco for Greece affected your writing?

  37. 

    Reblogged this on mediatantra and commented:
    “Minimize doubt. Find a way—a method, a trick, a psychological tic to dissolve doubt’s potency. You will most likely always be working alongside it, so best to have some useful way of repelling it. I write against it, a little like diving into a cold pool of water—scary but invigorating. Generally, it does the trick. But if that doesn’t work, get up and do something else. Forget about it for a while.
    Be gentle with yourself—you will find so many reasons not to be. But it’s most likely your kindness toward yourself (I’m not saying self-indulgence) that will help you alongside the rigors of constant, daily writing.
    I can’t speak to a practice that is anything less than daily. It’s the only one I know, so it’s the one I peddle.
    By writing daily, you make it your life.” – Anne Germanacos

  38. 
    euriatsealevel June 8, 2012 at 10:41 am

    Really touched by the “destroying to create something new” message. Writing every day is the best advice that anyone has ever given me as well. Thanks for the quick-and-dirty on how you have stuck with it.

  39. 

    Reblogged this on Jade Who? and commented:
    “minimise doubt”
    so true.

  40. 

    Thanks for sharing this inspirational interview

  41. 

    reblogged on http://jadewho.wordpress.com

    “minimise doubt”

    the writer’s greatest lesson, in two words.

  42. 

    all is very inspirational, including how you became a writer. I will definitely pass this on to my writing students. sheilaklewis@gmail.com
    http://www.meditatewritenow.weebly.com
    in progress website

  43. 

    I love this line….Writing brought the world into a different focus while conferring something that felt like a secret, additional self. Great description of the writing world for you.
    Thanks for sharing.
    You Matter! Smiles, Nancy

  44. 

    Reblogged this on imnotthatbad and commented:
    Great words!

  45. 

    Thoroughly enjoyed this and plan to work on several of the tips shared by this Author. Thank you for sharing your refined insights! 🙂

  46. 

    Reblogged this on Make Something Every Day and commented:
    Chalk art festival!? C’mooon!

  47. 

    Reblogged this on Fiore Rougee comentado:
    Ah, se eu conseguisse escrever direitinho…talvez seja isso que me falta: a disciplina de escrever diariamente. Vou tentar de agora em diante!

  48. 

    I am on the verge of publishing my first novel set in medieval china. Its fun, tiring, so scary and so much hard work. Doubt is certainly an unwanted but persistent companion in this journey. Thanks for sharing. New writers like me need to hear such advice to keep on going!

    http://www.jeremyhan.com

  49. 

    Reblogged this on Jeremy Han and commented:
    An inspiring interview to spur new writers on!

  50. 

    Thank you for your honesty. A wonderful journey that is inspiring.

  51. 

    Thanks for sharing.

  52. 

    This was an interesting read! So inspiring! I love to write myself 🙂

  53. 

    Reblogged this on french grits and commented:
    something to look at for my book later?

  54. 

    congratulations, brillant, i admire you and love you!
    i am a huge fan too! filia

  55. 

    New MFA candidate here. I love the image of “writing against doubt.” This act of going back to school (finally), of admitting I am a writer, is all about that for me. So much to write about. So little time. Thanks for the words of encouragement.

  56. 

    Thank you for posting. Every bit of help in writing is worth reading.

    Wayne

  57. 

    I liked that you write every day and think that publication is just an icing on the cake. It is so true. One gets all hug up on getting something published rather than enjoying the act of writing.

  58. 

    Very inspiring indeed! We “amateur” writers (the quotation marks both play down the scorn and hopefully contribute to minimizing doubt -mental note to my very self) need constant reminding, while there’s usually no-one to remind us, or come to it whenever faith is running out 😉
    Congrats on being FP, and thank a lot for sharing, always sharing art.

    To whoever would like to have a peek at freelance work in English/Spanish: http://avadapalabra.wordpress.com

  59. 

    What a great and introspective interview. Awesome read and congrats from one freshly pressed alum to another!

  60. 

    Very very inspirational. Tells me all I need to be a writer. And all that I might face.

  61. 

    Loved this. I’m sure you’ve read this plenty of times now, but I have every intention on being published and would consider it to be a number one goal. Currently, I am teaching abroad (have to make money lol), updating a personal blog, maintaining a website (my WordPress site) and doing journalism work for a Korean culture website. I love every bit of it, but still won’t feel accomplished until I’ve published a book of my own. Thanks for this.

  62. 

    Wonderfully written, and highly enjoyable. There is a cream-like quality to the blog, giving the same sensation one gets from dipping a finger into newly-made bowl of freshly whipped cream and forgetting about the calories. The bonus here of course is the calories received from reading your blog go straight to the mind as energy!

  63. 

    What a great, thoughtful, and helpful response. Thank you!

  64. 

    Great interview and the best quote …. “And one more thing: publication is the icing on the cake. The act of writing itself gives you a way to be in the world and is its own reward…” Very wise words.

  65. 
    SinghStyleStudio June 9, 2012 at 10:51 am

    interesting -n- interactive…

  66. 

    Reblogged this on Green Living Peace and commented:
    I couldn’t have explained my need for writing any better! I feel in a way it take great courage to put your thoughts out there in your writing! There is a certain fear of acceptance once finishing even the smallest piece!

  67. 

    Enjoyed this, thanks for sharing! Hopefully one day I’ll be a full time writer and people will be asking me for my thoughts on these things!! For now I’ll continue with my blogging!

  68. 

    For those of us with learning disabilities (dyslexia) your words of encouragement help tremendously.Thank you for sharing.

    PS, Oh! And thank God for the computer.

  69. 

    Since my human is an author, I shared your post with him – he read it and enjoyed it immensely.
    He always enjoys seeing what inspires and motivates writers. I asked him if your philosophies were similar and he replied, “No, in fact, they’re quite different. I try to keep what I scribble as simple as a sunset, as sincere as a child’s prayer, and as fresh as a morning shower. That’s why I like to read and learn from other fine writers such as Anne obviously is. If we all wrote the same, it would be a boring world – wouldn’t it?”

  70. 

    Absolutely spot on. Especially the part about writing every single day.
    http://recoveredbaptist.wordpress.com/

  71. 

    Wow. You know when you’re reading something and you’re trying to pull yourself away because you have something to do but you can’t because the thing you’re reading is just mesmerizing and captivating? If this is how Anne Germanacos answers simple questions I can only imagine how she writes…

  72. 

    I’ve heard the Greek word for ‘artist’ translates more literally to ‘intellectual scientist.’ I thank you for illuminating one of the reasons why their language is still more perfect than our own…

  73. 

    Minimize doubt—my favorite!
    Peace,
    Alexandria

  74. 

    I always enjoy fresh words to describe time-honored and universal feelings and experiences. I will post a link to your website from Poetmeister ..on the road to Parnassus. Thank you for a most enjoyable read.

  75. 

    Thank you for the post. This has inspired me to keep on writing. Cause one day I will get there.

  76. 

    Nice blog. Congrats on being Pressed!

  77. 

    I greatly enjoyed this piece; good information especially on lowering the “doubt” a writer would have. i experience that all too well at times. Great write up!!

  78. 

    Fascinating and tremendously helpful. Great post!

  79. 

    Inspiring and thoughtful. Thank you!

  80. 

    Reblogged this on I WIN.

  81. 

    Inspiring! Thank you. I enjoyed the part about being gentle with ourselves. It’s important to know when to step away . . . yet it’s hard because writing is so darn enjoyable (and therefore, addicting)! Loved the very last line, too. Great post.

  82. 

    Inspiring! Thank you. I enjoyed the part about being gentle with ourselves. It’s important to know when to step away . . . yet it’s hard because writing is so darn enjoyable (and therefore, addicting)! Loved the very last line, too. Great post.

  83. 

    This advice is very interesting and stimulating to the senses. It’s making me itch to write something fantastic again, which I haven’t been able to do in a while… Thank you very much for creating the blog and posting it for other creative writers and thinkers to see! It truly is an inspiration and could not have come at a better time for me!

  84. 

    Reblogged this on endlessencounters and commented:
    “By writing daily, you make it your life.
    And one more thing: publication is the icing on the cake. The act of writing itself gives you a way to be in the world and is its own reward. Publication just makes it okay, finally, to actually mention that you’re a writer.” That is perhaps the best advice any writer can get, to write daily and not worry too much about whether or not your work will get published. Of course, it would be nice, but if every writer were to rely solely on being published, then most of us would be discouraged from writing altogether. And believe me, that is an unnecessary added pressure.

  85. 

    Looks really good! Have to read it properly and take notes!

  86. 

    Reblogged this on j. p. bohannon and commented:
    I thought this was an interesting post. She seems an intelligent and thoughtful writer, and I am going to try to track down her book.

  87. 

    this was really interesting.

  88. 

    Hi! You are so right. Being a writer myself, I find it very hard to stay encouraged. Nevertheless, I would not stop being inspired no matter what! Great piece!

    Author Thelma Cunningham

    http://www.authorthelmacunningham.com

  89. 

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  90. 
    elizabethweaver June 10, 2012 at 11:05 pm

    Great interview. Thank you for posting it. I look forward to reading both Germanacos and the writers she recommended whom I’m unfamiliar with. I agree…write every day. I wish it were as easy to release the doubt.

  91. 

    Impressive, I would love to work with a writer of your caliber someday. I mean i am currently working on my second book by my first is done and needs a professional make over. Not asking or anything but your phd sure talks louder then most services i find online. Any who its awesome that you have achieved your standard in a field you love and i wish all the more success -,o

    http://wp.me/2aAA8

  92. 

    Wow, my typos sure prove what kind of work i need done huh? lol

  93. 

    Reblogged this on urban bamboo and commented:
    Great article on writing.

  94. 

    Reblogged this on Dynamic Wisdom.

  95. 

    Reblogged this on stevenfretter and commented:
    This serves as a great inspiration and encouragement for those seeking the path to become a writer.

  96. 

    “If we steal in the right way—from ourselves and the world—we may fashion (and be rewarded with) a gift. I love the ecology of writing, the way it turns nothing into something, generally without too much damage to the environment.”
    That is so beautifully put. I love this article.

  97. 

    Reblogged this on Tea Buddy and commented:
    Point # 5 in this post really speaks to me. This writer puts it so beautifully.

  98. 

    So many topics…..so little time. Thank you, for once again speaking the truth of the need for daily due diligence. I must make the time, somehow!

  99. 

    Inspired me. my notebook is sitting on my lap as we speak. am writing on….

  100. 

    i think she like to paint too

  101. 

    This was great to read. I always wonder how writers … write! This post was inspring!

  102. 

    Reblogged this on Chris Brooks and commented:
    Just in the nick of time I guess. Really dug these answers!

  103. 

    Very illuminating. I’m a definite fan as being a fellow writer. A college professor of mine told me a long time ago that the key to being an author is to simply write; eventually it will turn into a book & ready to publish. I took his advice and wrote my own book called The Awakening and self-published. To my amazement I sold out of my first printing! The experience gave me confidence and credibility of being a real author. We all have something to share, so share it!

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Awakening/155128207846845
    http://1divineperspective.wordpress.com/
    http://lmmiller34.wordpress.com/
    http://loveyourbody2010.wordpress.com/

  104. 

    This has really a different flavor. Thanks for sharing this.

  105. 

    Reblogged this on Bailey Blog and commented:
    We love to read Anne Germanacos short stories.

  106. 

    Great interview, doing a good job!

  107. 

    I loved this interview. I have never been published, other than self-published, other than posting my writing in my blog, but by her standards as delineated, to find pleasure by writing every day, to make writing a part of my daily life, then I too can call myself a writer. Thank you.

  108. 

    it’s inspiring.congrats!

  109. 
    innovationrogue June 12, 2012 at 10:39 am

    I’d love to take this advice and figure out how to transform it into a lesson plan to help students overcome their doubt. Thank you for the insight!

  110. 

    Nice blog. Thanks for sharing those useful information’s in all categories

  111. 
    Kiersten Marek June 12, 2012 at 7:06 pm

    Reblogged this on Kmareka.com and commented:
    For my writer friends, a marvelous interview with writer Anne Germanacos.

  112. 

    I love that opening quote, “As writers, we live double lives: lived once in the world of others, and again, in the quiet of our own minds.” Sometimes I feel I live more in the quiet portion and wonder if others “daydream” as much as I do. This was great, thanks for sharing.

  113. 

    “My writing is in constant (often unconscious) conversation with the books I read. ” I loved this phrase…because inspiration is everywhere, specially in what we read…and since talking about a book with its author is out of the question then we just end up talking with the book itself. Thanks for such valuable information, I’m pinning your book in hopes of buying it when I visit the USA again. Read you soon, Alexandra

  114. 

    Reblogged this on Rebecca Krumel – Introspection Dance and commented:
    Thanks, Freshly Pressed for posting this interview with Anne Germanacos which captivated and inspired me. From her interview, it seems she is a down-to-earth, lucid individual. Can’t wait to read some of her books!

  115. 

    “I became a writer by writing every day, creating, rewriting, sometimes destroying in order to make space for something new.” Yes! I want to steal this blurb, but replace writer with artist.

  116. 

    What a great read! Very inspiring thoughts. It’s funny how a crush can make us do things. Like going into a store and buying something just to talk to the hot guy behind the counter!

  117. 

    it’s a wonderful article, please continue post the interesting writing! thank you.

  118. 

    I must admit it ranks up there among one of the most unique blog ideas I have ever seen.

  119. 

    Precious waffle about the knack for turning a good sentence.

  120. 

    Great job on the blog, it looks great. I am going to bookmark it and will make sure to check back weekly!
    Thanks!

  121. 

    I would really like your post, it would really explain each and every point clearly well thanks for sharing.

  122. 

    Thanks for sharing this. I really liked the seo form

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    […] författarintervju här. Gillar framför allt svaret på fråga 5 – kloka ord! GillaGillaBli först att […]

  3. “Enact a kind of theft”; nice stories from other writers… | Natasha Latiff - June 9, 2012

    […] PHD in creative-writing As writers, we live double lives: lived once in the world of others, and again, in the quiet of our own minds. It takes a certain amount of will and courage to leave with regularity the circle of humanity in order to enact a kind of theft, which is one aspect of what the writing life seems to be. […]

  4. Constant Battle and the Seagull « Alwaysfreewilly: A Journey In Life - June 9, 2012

    […] About Anne Germanacos […]

  5. Att städa bland sina tankar. | Farmorsbloggen - June 10, 2012

    […] kom jag ihåg de kloka råden i den där intervjun med Anne Germanacos  som Kajsa Ingemarsson tipsade om i sin blogg häromsistens. Om vikten av att vara snäll mot […]

  6. owenswain » On Creative Process - June 11, 2012

    […] every day, creating, rewriting, sometimes destroying in order to make space for something new. [Source] [end] […]

  7. owenswain » On Creative Process - June 11, 2012

    […] every day, creating, rewriting, sometimes destroying in order to make space for something new. [Source] […]

  8. To be a writer… « View From the Ledge - June 12, 2012

    […] from an interview with Anne Germanacos at ph.d. in creative […]

  9. Schrijverswereld « Sylvia Kuijsten - June 13, 2012

    […] toch elke keer weer omschakelen van daily life naar de fictieve wereld van je boek. De quote van Anne Germanacos illustreert dat […]

  10. my secret life « splendidgibberish - June 13, 2012

    […] from an interview with Anne Germanacos at ph.d. in creative […]

  11. Book Giveaway: Celebrating Freshly Pressed « ph.d. in creative writing - June 13, 2012

    […] Germanacos and I were so excited to have our interview, “How Anne Germanacos Became a Writer,” featured on Freshly Pressed that we decided to celebrate by giving away signed copies of […]

  12. Another Book Giveaway: For Sale By Owner « ph.d. in creative writing - June 15, 2012

    […] not because no one will buy it. Anne Germanacos and I were so excited to have our interview, “How Anne Germanacos Became a Writer,” featured on Freshly Pressed that we decided to celebrate by giving away signed copies of […]

  13. Friday Fives. My Favorite Posts of the Week! « Chris Brooks - June 15, 2012

    […] this one earlier in the week, but it is still is one of my favorite posts this week: It’s an interview with an author about how and why she became a writer. Whether you are a dabbling writer or a published novelist, […]

  14. Reading Room XIV | Wadadli Pen - October 25, 2015

    […] w/Anne Germanacos: […]

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